occupy wall street, politics

Vote For Me


And I think I must be running out of things to blagh about on this blogging day when I start posting photos like those ones that find themselves posted above in my attempt to maintain web 2.0 social media user generated content for this blog whenever bloggers block possible. And those photos that I came across throughout my travels in internetland on this internet day read something like “VOTE FOR THE POLITICIAN YOU CAN TRUST (with that A for anarchist symbol below those words and then above the words Nobody 2012.” And then there’s that other photo I came across in facebookland that reads something like “Freedom Is A State Of Mind. Political Language Explained. Liberate/Occupy. Transparency/Secrecy. Hope/You’re Screwed. Change/More of the same. Promise/I’m lying. Bail out/Legal robbery. Sustainability/We want you dead. Terrorist/Anyone who stands in our way. War on terror/War of terror. Spreading Democracy/Forcing Imperialism. Citizen/Slave. News/Propaganda. Freedom Fighter/CIA/Private mercenary. Voting/False hope. Central bank/Pyramid Scheme. Conspiracy theorist/Shit, they’re on to us”. And even with those headline news of the day having something to do with that vote for us of a Republican National Convention and a don’t vote for them of an Occupy Tampa and that Hurricane Isaac threatening to wipe and wash everyone out to sea, and gun violence seeming to be never ending so much that that satirical of a newspaper The Onion finds itself with headlines that read Nation Celebrates Full Week Without Deadly Mass Shooting, and those states of New York and New Jersey find themselves under a Frack is wack frack attack, today still finds itself as Occupy Wall Street Day 347, a few weeks before the anniversary of that global revolution. And Occupy Wall Street is still moving fast. And what, if anything, does this have to do with a No Police State. Occupy Wall Street Worldwide.

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housing, politics, squattng

Squat The World


And on this day finds itself as Occupy Wall Street Day 160. And Occupy Wall Street and those global revolutions of a movement Occupy Together are still moving fast. And so here’s one of those emails that found itself in my email inbox the other day that I thought to repost on this blagh in an attempt to maintain content for this blog and my other blog whenever web 2.0 social media user generated content blaghers block possible.

Squatting Europe Kollective (SQEK) comes to CUNY Monday, Feb. 27

A collective of activist researchers from the European squatting movement are gathering in New York City. They will be at CUNY to meet with students and faculty and speak about the decades-old movements of squatting and building occupations in their respective countries. Generations of activists have participated in occupations of vacant buildings in Europe, beginning in the 1970s. With the worldwide rise of the Occupy movement, the deep reservoir of experience within the movements of political squatting have become suddenly significant. In two events at CUNY, these scholars and activists will share their methods for collective, participatory, interdisciplinary research and their knowledge of the history and present practices of squatting in Europe.

New York City, February 23-27, 2012
Squatting Europe Collective, New York City, February 23-27, 2012
1. Press release
2. Reception, Thursday 2/23 at ABC No Rio, 7-10pm
3. AAG sessions, Friday 2/24 at Hilton Hotel, 2nd floor Nassau Room
4. Saturday, February 25th, afternoon/evening – Public presentation: “Squatting in Europe: Prospects and Perspectives” at Living Theatre, 5-7pm; ends sharp; drinks afterwards at The Suffolk, Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center
5. Sunday, February 26th – brunch meeting at 16 Beaver Group 12-4pm // meet with O4O group at 7pm
6. Monday, February 27th – Public meeting with students and activists CUNY-GC 2-5 PM // Presentation at CUNY-GC 6:30-8:30pm
7. SQEK and House Magic library at Interference Archive, Brooklyn8. AAG session description (theoretical questions around militant research)Squatting Europe Kollective Convenes in New York City for the first time ever, a group of activist researchers from the European squatting movement are gathering in New York City. They will make public appearances to speak about the decades-old movement of squatting and building occupations in their respective countries.The tradition of political squatting is moving from the shadows into the light. With the world-wide rise of the Occupy movement, the deep reservoir of experience within the movements of political squatting have become suddenly significant.Generations of activists have participated in occupations of vacant buildings in Europe, beginning in the 1970s. The best known early success was the famous “free city” of Christiania in Copenhagen. But every major city in Europe has experienced some version of politicized squatting, most recently in the form of social centers.The members of SQEK – Squatting Europe Collective – have gathered for special sessions at the Association of American Geographers’ annual convention February 24. A public discussion, meetings, film and graphic arts exhibition are among the other activities planned for the meeting, Scheduled activities for SQEK 2012 New York City:2. Reception, Thursday 2/23 at ABC No Rio, 7-10pmThursday, February 23rd 7-10 pm – Reception for visiting researchers and activists
poster show of “House Magic” zine about squats and social centers
ABC No Rio cultural center
156 Rivington Street
Loisaida, NYC // abcnorio.org3. AAG sessions, Friday 2/24 at Hilton Hotel Squatting and Social Centers: Resistance and Production of Critical Spaces I
(5 sessions, 8am-6:20pm) in Nassau A, Second Floor, Hilton NY
Note: Single session costs a lot of money, but you can probably sneak into this room which we have all day. Look like you belong there; it will be a radical egghead party…
8:00 AM – 9:40 AM – Participants: Miguel A. Martinez (University Complutense of Madrid/CSOA Casablanca) and Lucy Finchett-Maddock (University of Exeter), Pierpaolo Mudu (University of Rome/Forte Prenestino), Hans Pruijt (Erasmus Universiteit, Rotterdam), Loredana Guerrieri (Osservatorio Di Genere, Istituto Storico Della Resistenza, Macerata, Italy), Matthias Bernt (Leibniz Institute for Regional Development and Structural Planning, Leipzig)10:00 AM – 11:40 AM – Participants: Linus Owens (Middlebury College, Vermont), Nathan Eisenstadt (Bristol University), Giovanni Piazza with Valentina Genovese (University of Catania), Alessia Marini (University of Rome, La Sapienza), Matthias Bernt2:40 PM – 2:20 PM – Participants:Elisabeth Lorenzi (UNED Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia), Amy Starecheski (CUNY City University of New York, Graduate Center, New York), Thomas Aguilera (Sciences Po, Paris), Andrea Aureli (St. John’s University, Rome), Matthias Bernt2:40 PM – 4:20 PM Panel session; Participants: Justus Uitermark (Erasmus University, Rotterdam); Maria Rodó de Zárate (UAB Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona); Giovanni Piazza; Miguel A. Martinez; Thomas Aguilera; Amy Starecheski; Hans Pruijt; Andrea Aureli; Eliot Tretter (University of Texas, Austin)4:40 PM – 6:20 – Mark Purcell (University of Washington, Seattle); Eli Meyerhoff (University of Minnesota); Pierpaolo Mudu; Lucy Finchett-Maddock; Nathan Eisenstadt; Alessia Marini; Loredana Guerrieri; Elisabeth Lorenzi; Salvatore Engel-DiMauro (SUNY State University of New York, New Paltz)4. Saturday, February 25th – SQEK internal meeting 9am-12pm LOCATION TBD5. Saturday, February 25th, afternoon/evening – Public presentation: “Squatting in Europe: Prospects and Perspectives” (Living Theatre, 21 Clinton St half a block below Houston Street, 5-7pm; ends on the dot of 7pm); drinks afterwards at The Suffolk, Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center, southwest corner Suffolk and Rivington
Public presentation by members of the Squatting Europe Collective (SQEK)
“Squatting in Europe: Prospects and Perspectives”
A roundtable with the members of SQEK

Confirmed participants in a roundtable public presentation are: Miguel Martinez, Elisabeth Lorenzi (Madrid, Spain), Hans Pruijt (Rotterdam, Netherlands), Gianni Piazza (Sicily), Eliseo Fucolti (Rome, Italy), Thomas Aguilera (Paris, France), Lucy Finchett-Maddock (United Kingdom), Lynn Owens, Tina Steiger (Copenhagen/USA), Alan W. Moore (Madrid/USA)6. Sunday, February 26th – Public meetings with activists
noon-4pm – brunch and afternoon session at 16 Beaver Group, 16 Beaver St., Wall St. area (tentatively confirmed)
7pm – Catholic Worker auditorium (55 East Third St.) – a round table, “talking turkey” with activists of O4O (Organizing for Occupation)7. Monday, February 27th –2-5 PM, in Room 5409, SQEK members will have an open meeting to discuss their research projects and approaches with interested students and the public.6:30-8:30 PM, in Room C201, SQEK researchers will discuss European squatting movements.8. SQEK “Living Library” at Interference Archive, Brooklyn, continuing throughout the weekend
131 8th St. #4. Brooklyn, NY 11215 (Gowanus) 2 blocks from the F/G/R trains (4th ave. and 9th st.)3. AAG session Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting 2012 // Friday, 24 February, 2012

Squat the world. Housing is a human right. Have a great squatter day and more.

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politics, religion

Congregation Segregation Again

Hey again bloggers, or whoever could be reading this blog. And even though on this day finds itself as Occupy Wall Street Day 146. And those global revolutions of a movement of Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Together are still moving fast, this blagh post seems to be about church, you know that holy place where one finds God, I think. And somehow I came across a conversation about finding a church to get baptized so one can be saved and not die and go to hell or something like that. And in that quest to find one of those baptize me and save me so I don’t die and go to hell churches it was discovered that one must be a member of a church to get baptized. Hugh? What’s up with that. A church bureaucratic loop? Church red tape? The one place that I would think would be inclusive and welcome all is exclusive with hoops to jump through. And so in that quest to find a church that would baptize non members it was discovered that there are no churches that baptize non members. And even if one is a member of that church, one must go to church classes before one gets baptized. Hugh? More church red tape? Does that internet bible Wikipedia have an answer for this? Has this be a member of a church to get baptized thing always been like this? Does one have to wander the earth the rest of ones days non baptized potentially burning in hell for the sake of not being a member of someones church. And so those find a church somewhere on planet earth that will baptize non members thoughts has me wanting to repost that Congregation Segregation blog post that was posted on this blog and my other blog some time a while ago in an attempt to maintain content for this blog whenever web 2.0 social media user generated content possible.

Easter must be coming up soon because the stores are filled with chocolate bunnies everywhere. And This Holy Week thing is making me wonder, are churches the most segregated places on planet earth? I just realized that every time I want to go to church I have to find a church mass, communion and religious worship service for my “Demonination” my nationality. For what reason can’t all churches welcome everyone regardless of your race, color or creed. The one place where one goes to find God and be free is not free, it’s segregated by nationality and denominations. It’s either all Christian, all Protestant, all Jewish, all Episcopalian, all Catholic, all Muslim, all Buddhist or all something else.
This Tower of Babel confusion of the languages, cultures and nations thing has got me confused.
And what if I want to go to church with someone who is not my nationality? We’d have to look around really hard to find a church that would accept both of our nationalities. I do believe there are some free, liberal, multicultural and diverse churches who welcome everyone such as Interfaith, Unitarian and Universalist churches who approach faith, religion and spirituality in a non traditional, creedless and non dogmatic way and have no creedal requirements imposed on their members. Times Square Church in Manhattan is an example of this. But for the most part, churches have always remained segregated.
I am losing faith in the churches for this reason, they seem Saint Hypocritical and Saint Elitist in their God loves you for who you are speeches. Where can I go to find God and not be judged by the color of my skin? Should I just become an Atheist? Happy Easter.
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life, money, occupy wall street, politics

An Occupy Wall Street Quote

And on this day finds itself another one of those Sundays that has rolled around. The day of the sun, the day of rest. Or is that Saturday, the Sabbath. And yet I find myself blah blogging away for some reason or another. The only thing constant is change and some stories do not end as you expect. And unless you have been stuck in the stone age or under one of those rocks the past few months, one must have heard of Occupy Wall Street by now, that global revolution of a movement. And Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Together are still moving fast. And in my travels throughout internetland on this day I came across one of those George Orwell quotes for this movement, and 2011, 12 = 1984, and also a Martin Niemoller quote that finds itself quoted for this Occupy Wall Street movement on this Occupy Wall Street day whose Martin Niemoller sermons quote title that seems to be called “First They Came”, reads something like as follows:

First they came for the communists,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a communist.

Then they came for the trade unionists,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews,
and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a Jew.

Then they came for the Catholics,
and I didn’t speak out because I was Protestant.

Then they came for me
and there was no one left to speak out for me.

Als die Nazis die Kommunisten holten,
habe ich geschwiegen;
ich war ja kein Kommunist.

Als sie die Sozialdemokraten einsperrten,
habe ich geschwiegen;
ich war ja kein Sozialdemokrat.

Als sie die Gewerkschafter holten,
habe ich nicht protestiert;
ich war ja kein Gewerkschafter.

Als sie die Juden holten,
habe ich geschwiegen;
ich war ja kein Jude.

Als sie mich holten,
gab es keinen mehr, der protestierte.
When the Nazis came for the communists,
I remained silent;
I was not a communist.

When they locked up the social democrats,
I remained silent;
I was not a social democrat.

When they came for the trade unionists,
I did not speak out;
I was not a trade unionist.

When they came for the Jews,
I remained silent;
I wasn’t a Jew.

When they came for me,
there was no one left to speak out.

First they came for the Jews
and I did not speak out
because I was not a Jew.
Then they came for the Communists
and I did not speak out
because I was not a Communist.
Then they came for the trade unionists
and I did not speak out
because I was not a trade unionist.
Then they came for me
and there was no one left
to speak out for me.

and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Communist.
Then they came for the Jews,
and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Jew.
Then they came for the trade unionists,
and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a trade unionist.
Then they came for the Catholics,
and I didn’t speak up because I was a Protestant.
Then they came for me –
and by that time no one was left to speak up.

Other translations or variants:

In Germany, they came first for the Communists, And I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Communist;
And then they came for the trade unionists, And I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a trade unionist;
And then they came for the Jews, And I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Jew;
And then . . . they came for me . . . And by that time there was no one left to speak up.
Twenty-five years later Niemöller indicated that this was the version he preferred, in a 1971 interview.
When the Nazis came for the communists,
I did not speak out;
As I was not a communist.

When they locked up the social democrats,
I did not speak out;
I was not a social democrat.

When they came for the trade unionists,
I did not speak out;
As I was not a trade unionist.

When they came for the Jews,
I did not speak out;
As I was not a Jew.

When they came for me,
there was no one left to speak out.
When the Nazis arrested the Communists,
I said nothing; after all, I was not a Communist.
When they locked up the Social Democrats,
I said nothing; after all, I was not a Social Democrat.
When they arrested the trade unionists,
I said nothing; after all, I was not a trade unionist.
When they arrested me, there was no longer anyone who could protest.
First the Nazis came…
First they came for the communists, and I did not speak out —
because I was not a communist;
Then they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out —
because I was not a socialist;
Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out —
because I was not a trade unionist;
Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out —
because I was not a Jew;
Then they came for me —
and there was no one left to speak out for me.

And what, if anything, does this have to do with a No Police State.
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politics, religion, spiritual, symbols

A Symbol


And somehow I came across this posting about swastikas throughout my internet travels in facebookland on this day. And I think that some people aren’t aware that the swastika originates from a Hindu symbol, the Fylfot Cross. And the swastika is simply the Hindu, Himalayan and Brhamanist symbol for the wheel of life. the Nazis turned it around. The swastika can have many different meanings (the sun, the four directions, changes in the seasons, peace, and others, including Native American, Hindu, Buddhist, Celtic and Pagan traditions. And so I thought to post some of what that Symbol Dictionary website says in my attempt to maintain content for this blog and my other blog whenever web 2.0 social media user generated content blaghers block possible. Have a great Fylfot Cross day and more.

The swastika is an archetypal, universal human religious symbol. It appears on every continent and is as old as humankind. A marker of the sun’s travels, it can be seen on Pictish rock carvings, adorning ancient Greek pottery, and on ancient Norse weapons and implements. It was scratched onto cave walls in France seven thousand years ago. A swastika marks the beginning of many Buddhist scriptures, and is often incised on the soles of the feet of the Buddha in statuary. In the Jain religion, the swastika is a symbol of the seventh Jina (Saint), the Tirthankara Suparsva. To Native Americans, the swastika is a symbol of the sun, the four directions, and the four seasons.

Geometrically, the swastika is a type of solar cross, with arms bent at right angles, suggesting a whirling or turning motion. Long before the symbol was co-opted as an emblem of Hitler’s Nazi party, it was a sacred symbol to Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist religions, as well as in Norse, Basque, Baltic, and Celtic Paganism. The name Swastika is derived from the Sanskrit language, from “su,” meaning “good,” and “vasti”,” meaning “being” (together; well being) In India, it is used as a fertility and good luck charm. The right turning Indian swastika symbolizes the sun and positive energy, and is most commonly associated with the deity Ganesh, a God of prosperity and wealth. Some Indians regard an anti-clockwise swastika as an opposing, dark force- a symbol of the godess Kali. Together, the two can be regarded as symbolically similar to the Yin Yang symbol of Taoism, or the two Pillars of Kabbalah. The swastika is also known for its uses in heraldry as the tetraskelion- the fylfot cross (fylfot meaning ‘four feet,’ a term used in european heraldry), the cross gammadion (because it resembles four greek letter ‘gammas.’), and the hakenkreutz (German, hooked cross).

The swastika used in Buddhist art and scripture is known as a Manji, and represents Dharma, universal harmony, and the balance of opposites. When facing left, it is the Omote (front) Manji, representing love and mercy. Facing right, it represents strength and intelligence, and is called the Ura (rear facing) Omoje. Balanced Manji are often found at the beginning and end of buddhist scriptures. You can read more about Manji here. In pre-Christian Pagan Europe, the swastika was generally a solar symbol, but in many cases, its use dates so far back in history that its original meaning is obscured. In Baltic regions, the swastika is sometimes called the “thunder cross,” and is associated with the Thunder God Perkons (Perkunis):
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civil rights, martial law, No Police State, politics

Hope You Don’t Get Indefinitely Detained


And today finds itself as Occupy Wall Street Day 109. And Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Together those global revolutions, are still moving fast. And it’s 2012 this AD year, an awakening, a time for change. And somehow I came across that photo that finds itself posted above throughout my internet travels on this web 2.0 social media user generated content day. And that Hope You Don’t Get Indefinitely Detained NDAA, National Defense Authorization Police State Martial Law Draconian of an Act law photo that finds itself posted above seems to speak for itself. This Act was signed quietly this past New Years Eve violating what little trust remained between the people and their established government. And what does this have to do with a No Police State.
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Arab Spring, life, money, occupy wall street, politics, Time Magazine

Time Magazine Person of the Year 2011: The Protester


And Time Magazine has their recent issue with their Time Magazine Person of the Year 2011: The Protester article as its cover story that has appeared on this day. And I know Time Magazine has that recent Time Magazine Person of the Year 2011: The Protester issue that has appeared on this day because all of these news articles announcing that Time Magazine person of the year says so. And that description for that Time Magazine Person of the Year 2011 article at their website reads something like as follows.

“Person Of The Year. TIME. The Protester. From The Arab Spring To Athens, From Occupy Wall Street To Moscow.”

“A year after a Tunisian fruit vendor set himself ablaze, dissent has spread across the Middle East, reaching Europe and the U.S., reshaping global politics and redefining people power.”

And what, if anything does this have to do with a No Police State?
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